was successfully added to your cart.

Democracy Has Bad Taste

By November 11, 2016Uncategorized
Listen in pop-out player

In the first of four lectures with the BBC, recorded in front of an audience at Tate Modern in London, the artist Grayson Perry reflects on the idea of quality and examines who and what defines what we see and value as art. He argues that there is no empirical way to judge quality in art. Instead the validation of quality rests in the hands of a tightknit group of people at the heart of the art world including curators, dealers, collectors and critics who decide in the end what ends up in galleries and museums. Often the last to have a say are the public.
Perry examines the words and language that have developed around art critique, including what he sees as the growing tendency to over-intellectualise the response to art. He analyses the art market and quotes – with some irony – an insider who says that certain colours sell better than others. He queries whether familiarity makes us like certain artworks more, and encourages the public to learn to appreciate different forms of art through exploration and open-mindedness.
Perry was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003, and is known for his ceramic works, printmaking, drawing, sculpture and tapestry as well as for his cross-dressing and alter-ego, Claire.
The Reith lectures are presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.
Producer: Jim Frank.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03969vt

Grayson Perry, The Walthamstow Tapestry (2009)Seattle Artist League: art school, art classes, painting classes, figure drawing

Leave a Reply