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Help Us Choose Our Mascot

By September 12, 2017Uncategorized

Vote for your favorite Seattle Artist League mascot! The winning entry could end up on a poster, or as a mural on our building. Please see entries below, and use the comments to cast your vote. Forward to your friends, this is open to all. Still want to submit an idea? Late entries accepted. Voting ends at midnight Sept 16, 2017.

New Mascot Entry:

Artist’s entry: “A Bower Bird (a satin bower bird to be exact) chosen because of their artistic abilities. Using local materials of various colors, shapes and sizes the create beautiful bowers to attract mates. When that doesn’t work they dance.

 

In some places they’re tall towers made of sticks resting upon a round mat of dead black moss, decorated with snail shells, acorns, and stones. In other places, they’re woven towers built upon a platform of green moss, adorned with fruits, flowers, and severed butterfly wings. Individual Vogelkop bowerbirds have their own tastes, preferring certain colours to others. The males place each item in their bowers with great precision; if the objects are moved, the birds return them to the original arrangement.
“Decorating decisions are not automatic but involved trials and ‘changes of mind,'” wrote UCLA physiologist Jared Diamond, one of the first researchers to intensively study the birds’ complex bowers. Diamond discovered that bower building was not innate, at least not entirely. The younger birds had to learn how to build the best bowers, either through trial and error, or by watching more experienced birds, or both.
Diamond concluded that bower building was a culturally transmitted creative process where each bird had his or her own individual tastes and preferences, and where each decision was made with intention and care. Bowerbirds, in other words, are animal artists – at least in sense that they take care in producing unique works that humans and birds alike find aesthetically pleasing.
My thought is that SAL is place (a bower, if you will) where art is both taught and created using the tools at our disposal and community (mates in the platonic sense) are drawn together to produce unique works.”

 

Read more:
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/not-bad-science/what-makes-bowerbirds-such-good-artists/

Vote for your favorite mascot, using the comments below.

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